Larisa English Club 24 Audio PDF Download

Larisa English Club #24 PDF Version

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Welcome to Larisa English Club #24

What’s in The News? Why is it Important to Eat Fruit and Vegetables?

Speaking Practice. Having Things Done and I Wonder if?

English Grammar. Modal Verbs of Probability Present and Future!
What’s in The News?
Why is it Important to Eat Fruit and Vegetables?

Eating fruit provides health benefits — people who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide nutrients vital for health and maintenance of your body. Most fruits are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. None have cholesterol. Fruits are sources of many essential nutrients that are under-consumed, including potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and folate (folic acid). Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Fruit sources of potassium include bananas, prunes and prune juice, dried peaches and apricots, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, and orange juice.

Dietary fiber from fruits, as part of an overall healthy diet, helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. Fiber-containing foods such as fruits help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories. Whole or cut-up fruits are sources of dietary fiber. Vitamin C is important for growth and repair of all body tissues, helps heal cuts and wounds, and keeps teeth and gums healthy. Folate (folic acid) helps the body form red blood cells. Eating a diet rich in vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet may reduce risk for heart disease, including heart attack and stroke.

Read more at ChooseMyPlate.gov http://bit.ly/2bRHWCX
Speaking Practice.
Having Things Done and I Wonder if?

Steve: Excuse me. I wonder if you can help me.

Mike: Sure. What is it?

Steve: I want to have my hair cut, but I can’t find a barber shop.

Mike: I know where one is. Come on—I’ll show you.

Language Notes

I wonder if… A polite introduction to a request for assistance.

Some other examples:

I wonder if you could show us how to get there.

I wonder if you would mind moving over one, so my friend and I can sit together. I wonder if you can tell me where I can find a barber shop.

Sure! What is it? = What is it you would like me to do?

Have my hair cut = Have someone cut my hair.

Other ways to use have:

I had my shoes shined just before I came. We’re going to have our house painted next year. You should have that window repaired before the rainy season begins.

Barber shop = A compound noun, with the principal stress on the first word.

I know where one is = I know where the barber shop is located.
English Grammar.
Modal Verbs of Probability Present and Future!

Modal verbs are one of my favorite subjects. They are often considered one of the most important parts of the English language. The diverse usage of Modal auxiliary verbs makes them extremely useful and yet complicated for some students. Modal auxiliary verbs are just that; Auxiliary Verbs. In perfect speech, they are always used with another verb.

Modal verbs are used to refer to time, manners, ability, desire, wants, politeness and more. Modal Auxiliary Verbs also help us to express doubt, fear, commitment, assumptions, ideas and thoughts. In this article, I will help you with different ways we use Modal Verbs for now and the future. Modal verbs of future probability are an important part of the English language.

The first Modal Verbs studied are usually “can and could”. Can and could are often referred to as “Modals of ability”. In other words, can and could are often used to express something we do as an action or as a state. Examples might be “Can you ride a bike?” or “Can you play guitar?”. An answer could be “Yes, I can” or “No, I can’t”. Other Modals are taught as we study at the higher levels.

So, what about the future and a “Modal verb” plus the verb “To be?”. We use Modal verbs and the verb “To be” when we refer to the present and the future. An example might be; “Will you be home tomorrow?” or “Where will you be tomorrow?”. “Will” is commonly used for the future. Other examples might be “Can you come to work at 2 tomorrow?”. Can, could, will, would, shall, should, may, might and must can all be used to refer to future events. This tense is “Present Simple for the Future”. It is often referred to as “Timetabled events”.

We also use “Future Continuous” to refer to “Future Events”. An example of this might be “Will you be coming over at 3 tomorrow? short answer “Yes, I will”. The use of “Will” is common for both “Future Simple” and Future Continuous” statements. Remember that “Adverbs” are extremely important in the English language. As a modifier, “Adverbs” do just that; they modify our statements in combination with “Verbs, Adjectives, Adverbs and entire sentences”.

The use of “Adverbs” allows a better or clearer understanding when we communicate. Another extremely common word combination to express the “Present and Future” is “I would like”. Short form or as a contraction; I’d like”. An example might be “I’d like to visit my friends tomorrow”. Tomorrow is the “Adverb”. “I’d like” is a future intention.

We also use this expression for requests and offers at the time of speech. An example might be “I’d like a cup of coffee please”. This is an “Indirect Request”. It is often used as a polite way to simply ask someone for something. This article is a brief explanation of the use of “Modal verbs”. Remember, we use “Modal Auxiliary Verbs and Adverbs” in many ways in the English language.
Until next time…

Remember that teaching a subject also helps a student learn faster. Study grammar and teach others what you have learned!
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Audio MP3 English Grammar Nouns Playlist

What are Infinitive Verbs? Grammar Review

A verb tense tells you when something happens. We need verbs to build a complete sentence. Verbs come in three tenses; “Present, Past, Future”. Verbs can be broken down into “Regular or Irregular verbs”. There are countless regular verbs in English. There are less than 200 irregular verbs in everyday use. Irregular verbs consist of three forms: “Infinitive, Past simple, Past Participle“. Regular verbs also consist of three forms but, “Past simple and Past Participle“ are formed by adding “ed” to an infinitive verb. The verb “To be” is the most common verb in English both as a full verb and auxiliary verb. We use infinitive verbs to ask and answer questions. An infinitive verb is the basic form of a verb. Below are a few examples to study. In English, most nouns are also verbs. If you know the noun, you know the verb as well.

Larisa English Club #20

Larisa English Club #20 Audio Version

What’s in The News?
Microgreen Study Shows Health Benefits.

“Microgreens” are tender young plants grown from the seed of certain herb, vegetable, and grain crops that can be clipped at the stem and eaten fresh within 2 weeks of germinating.

Some chefs have touted the taste, texture, color, and delicate appearance of microgreens, adding them to soups, salads, sandwiches, and main dishes. Microgreens can also contain more nutrients than full-grown plants. Red cabbage microgreens, in particular, have garnered attention for their potential to help protect against chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of death in the United States.

“Although microgreens, such as those from red cabbage, have been reported to possess more nutrients [than mature plants] and are perceived to be ‘healthier,’ no known study has been conducted to evaluate whether consumption reduces cardiovascular disease risk factors,” according to Agricultural Research Service (ARS) chemist Thomas Wang and his co-authors in the December 2016 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Read more here: http://bit.ly/2qK4cKH

What are Count Nouns?

What are Count Nouns? Grammar Review

What are Count Nouns? Grammar Review

Count or Countable nouns can be referred to as one or many (Plural). Most nouns in English are countable. Countable nouns are referred to as concrete nouns. If you can count it, it is countable. Abstract nouns refer to intangible things like ideas, actions, feelings, ideals, concepts and qualities. However, there are general rules. Liquids, grains, and most collective nouns are considered uncountable. Many nouns are both uncountable and countable when we use quantifiers. Fruit and vegetables are just two collective nouns that are both. Count nouns can be divided into smaller units you can see or hear individually. Most but, not all count nouns can be pluralized by adding a final ‘s to the nouns. Many plural nouns are spelled differently. If you can place a number before the noun, it is countable. Don’t forget, most nouns are also verbs in the English language! Ask your teacher for a more detailed explanation and examples. Have fun with nouns!

Larisa English Club #19

Larisa English Club #19

What’s in The News? Road to The United States Constitution.

Speaking Practice. Academy Awards.

English Grammar. Verbs + Infinitive or –ING
What’s in The News?
Road to The United States Constitution.

America’s search for a plan of national government was a slow, difficult process. Compromise, cooperation, and creativity were required as the Americans moved from being colonials in a patriarchal monarchy to citizen-leaders in a representative republic of federal states. Most of this process took place in the midst of a long, revolutionary war. Not only were these “the times that try men’s souls,” in the words of Thomas Paine, they were also the times that tested Americans’ intellects and practical political skills in creating a strong, national, republican government.

The Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, the first constitution of the United States, on November 15, 1777, but the states did not ratify them until March 1, 1781. The Articles created a loose confederation of sovereign states and a weak central government, leaving most of the power with the state governments.

Divisions among the states and even local rebellions threatened to destroy the fruits of the Revolution. Nationalists, led by James Madison, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Wilson, almost immediately began working toward strengthening the federal government. They turned a series of regional commercial conferences into a national constitutional convention at Philadelphia in 1787.

Learn more here: http://bit.ly/2x3h9hi

What are Count Nouns?

What are Count Nouns? Grammar Review

Visit What are Count Nouns? Grammar Review Audio Version

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What are Count Nouns? Grammar Review

Count or Countable nouns can be referred to as one or many (Plural). Most nouns in English are countable. Countable nouns are referred to as concrete nouns. If you can count it, it is countable. Abstract nouns refer to intangible things like ideas, actions, feelings, ideals, concepts and qualities. However, there are general rules. Liquids, grains, and most collective nouns are considered uncountable.

Many nouns are both uncountable and countable when we use quantifiers. Fruit and vegetables are just two collective nouns that are both. Count nouns can be divided into smaller units you can see or hear individually. Most but, not all count nouns can be pluralized by adding a final ‘s to the nouns. Many plural nouns are spelled differently. If you can place a number before the noun, it is countable. Don’t forget, most nouns are also verbs in the English language! Ask your teacher for a more detailed explanation and examples. Have fun with nouns!

Concrete Noun Examples

One table, two chairs, three pencils, four books, five computers!

Concrete Collective Nouns with Quantifiers

Piece of furniture, school of fish, colony of bees, army of ants!

Collective Count/Uncountable Noun Examples

One vegetable, two fruits, three metals, four valuables!

Concrete Nouns Spelled Differently

Child/Children, Man/Men, Leaf/Leaves, Wolf/Wolves, Wife/Wives!

There is a lot more to the subject of nouns. This grammar review is just a small part of English to help you better understand the subject of nouns.
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Larisa English Club #18

Larisa English Club #18

English Grammar.

Me Too / Me Neither

The easiest way to agree in English is to say ”Me too” (to agree with a positive statement) or “Me neither” (to agree with a negative statement):

“I love strawberry ice cream.” (Response) “Me too!”

“I don’t go to the gym very often.” (Response) “Me neither.”

A “negative statement” is any sentence that uses a negative auxiliary verb. In other words a verb used with “Not”.

don’t / doesn’t / didn’t (Verb “Do” with “Not”).

can’t (Modal verb “Can” with “Not”).

haven’t / hasn’t / hadn’t (Verb “Have” with “Not”).

won’t / wouldn’t (Modal verb “Will” with “Not”).

isn’t / aren’t / am not (Verb “To be” with “Not”).

You can say “Me too” or “Me neither” in response to statements in any tense (present, past, future, present continuous, present perfect, past perfect, etc.)

Флешкарточки. Английские существительные

Наши флешкарточки с существительными помогут вам расширить словарный запас, а также улучшить произношение. Смотрите картинки, слушайте носителя языка и повторяйте слова! Каждый ролик содержит самые разные существительные.